Washington CAP Pilot Damages Plane on Hard Landing

Civil Air Patrol

By NTSB | FAA Aviation Accident Database

Analysis

The check-out CAP pilot reported that the landing was accomplished to runway 05 with winds from 30 degrees at 12 knots, gusting to 21 knots. During the flare for landing, with the private pilot in command, the airspeed rapidly decreased from 60 knots to 40 knots. The check-out CAP pilot immediately added full throttle, but the aircraft landed hard on the main wheels. The checkout pilot took control of the aircraft during the resulting bounce and initiated a go-around.

During the climb, the check-out CAP pilot determined there was no unairworthy mechanical,
electrical, structural conditions, or adverse aircraft handling characteristics and opted to return to Bremerton where a landing was made without further incident. Maintenance personnel
inspected the aircraft and found structural damage to the firewall.

Factual Information

On March 13, 2005, about 1315 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N96985, registered to
and operated by the Civil Air Patrol as a 14 CFR Part 91 qualifying checkout flight, experienced a hard landing at Sanderson Field Airport, Shelton, Washington. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed.

The CAP aircraft was substantially damaged and the certificated private pilot-in-command and the flight instructor (check-out CAP pilot) were not injured. The flight departed from Bremerton, Washington, at 1210.

The check-out CAP pilot reported that the landing was accomplished to runway 05 with winds from 30 degrees at 12 knots, gusting to 21 knots. During the flare for landing, with the private pilot in command, the airspeed rapidly decreased from 60 knots to 40 knots. The check-out CAP pilot immediately added full throttle, but the aircraft landed hard on the main wheels.

The check-out CAP pilot took control of the aircraft during the resulting bounce and initiated a go-around. During the climb, the check-out pilot determined there was no unairworthy mechanical, electrical, structural conditions, or adverse aircraft handling characteristics and opted to return to Bremerton where a landing was made without further incident.

Maintenance personnel at Bremerton inspected the aircraft and found wrinkles in the skin
forward of the right side door post, wrinkles to the firewall and lower stringer.

Probable Cause & Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: The pilot’s improper flare which resulted in a hard landing.

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